C2V
MODULEitus
a general understanding of Modules 
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Uisige Gorm, Cntr Module Wartsilla Diesel
Uisige Gorm, Cntr Module Wartsilla Diesel
DPS Thruster, e'motor / Wartsilla Driver Powered
DPS Thruster, e'motor / Wartsilla Driver Powered
Wartsilla Diesel, Typical Driver
Wartsilla Diesel, Typical Driver
C2V
C2V
This section uses Uisige Gorm and West Navion  to explain Power Generation with particular reference to Diesels and  Modules. The first instance concerns  motive power for Process and in the second for Propulsion.
The picture of Uisige Gorm shows the profile of the conventional FPSO based on a converted tanker. At the stage shown in the Plaque it has only the Power Module on its deck. This Module uses Wartsilla as unitised driver for power/water injection. If we consider the main propulsion driver we have the typical marine diesel by B & W, Wartsila, MAN etc which uses large inline cylinders (4 to 16) with large pot diameter of nearly a metre. Engines of this type vary in size according to the tanker size 100,000 - 250,000 te dwt. and the prime objective is to run on general marine bunkered fuels at a good average ships cruising speed, economically.
If we now address West Navions propulsion we again find a Wartsilla engine similar to the power driver on Uisige Gorm. Instead of a single or twin screw it has a series of Thrusters mounted in cans which can be directionally controlled by a Dynamically Positioning System. The requirements for this Drill Ship are to cruise from one drill site to another at a reasonable speed, when 3 or 4 engines are used. when it gets to location then the need for dynamically position (DPS) needs 1 or possibly only 2 engines. All 4 engines are all committed to propulsion. The Aker Ram Rig requires power and to meet this Wartsilla Engines are used housed in a Power Module.
The Picture of a Wartsila engine under test is as used in Uisige Gorm (for Process) and West Navion (for Drilling). The required power is achieved by banking up engines in series. Very often these are installed in modules and pretested prior to installation as a complete power package. The engines themselves also follow modular concepts. They comprise a system of unitised components for casing, pot, top of engine etc and mounting on a block 4 to 16  in line. As they are so often used in Marine applications they are when prime ships components produced to Survey , e.g. Lloyds. The sites linked give more detail. The engine bed to take this Driver is incorporated into the base of the Deck Module.